1. And then Jack chopped down what was the world’s last beanstalk, adding murder and ecological terrorism to the theft, enticement, and trespass charges already mentioned, and all the giant’s children didn’t have a daddy anymore. But he got away with it and lived happily ever after, without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done…which proves that you can be excused for just about anything if you are a hero, because no one asks inconvenient questions.
    — 

    Susan Sto Helit, Hogfather

    (Sentences like this are the reason why Susan is my spirit animal)

    (Source: missviolethunterwrites)

     
  2. 23:01

    Notes: 118599

    Reblogged from jescissa

    Tags: hp

    nivalingreenhow:

    when McGonagall finds out that Ginny is pregnant, and that the Weasley and Potter bloodlines will converge, she marks on her calender the day the child will turn 11 and that is the day she retires 

     
  3. "A poem? Sappho wrote a poem for me. I don’t believe it."

    (Source: ode-to-simplicity)

     
  4. 23:44 22nd Jul 2014

    Notes: 5424

    Reblogged from frith-in-thorns

    Tags: SKYNET

    premierbonheur:

    emes:

    arutairu:

    algopop:

    Bots - talking amongst themselves - via

    A twitter conversation between two bots (@oliviataters and @notkeithcalder) was picked up and intercepted by the Bank of America bot account. This is twitter bot culture sans humans. 

    they’re forming societies

    i’m so tickled by this exchange oh my GOD

    different are soffftttt

     
  5. chartermagic:

    I now have duvet covers available with my art on! 

    http://society6.com/lauratolton/duvet-covers

     
  6. such-heights:

    Level Up
    by such_heights
    fandom: Buffy the Vampire Slayer
    music: Level Up - Vienna Teng
    content notes: none 
    summary: ”I always think, ‘What would Buffy do?’ You’re my hero.”
    download: 48MB zipped .avi

     
  7. 23:08

    Notes: 235936

    Reblogged from time-travelling-victorian021

    Tags: giftsetwomen

    ericscissorhands:

    "Some women are lost in the fire. Some women are built from it."

     
  8. 23:06

    Notes: 22213

    Reblogged from lifeofkj

    Tags: science!

    image: Download

    allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

    allrightcallmefred:

    fredscience:

    The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

    I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

    Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

    The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

    Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

    I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

     
  9. Danielle Brooks & Samira Wiley on Celebrity Girl Crushes

    (Source: frankydagostino)

     
  10. 23:03

    Notes: 126819

    Reblogged from nine-worlds-geekfest

    Tags: hp

    Muggleborn culture at Hogwarts AUs and I have a special relationships

    gogoravenclaw:

    I mean

    image

    have you READ THEM

    image

    aren’t they adorable

    image

    i want to go to hogwarts

    image

    FRICKLE FRACKLE MUGGLEBORNS ARE ADORABLE